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Environment

Downy mildew research to benefit lettuce growers and consumers

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, will use the genomics of lettuce to combat a pathogen that causes losses in the $3 billion industry each year.

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Large stretches of coral reefs can be rehabilitated

Even after being severely damaged by blast fishing and coral mining, coral reefs can be rehabilitated over large scales using a relatively inexpensive technique, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, in partnership with Mars Symbioscience.

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Famed Viking ship museum to be torn down due to rising sea

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — Denmark's famed Viking ship museum, damaged by the rising sea level in 2013, will be torn down... Read More

Experts: climate change and water

The following sources from the University of California, Davis, are available to talk with media about climate change impacts and solutions related to water. 

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Grasslands more reliable carbon sink than trees

Forests have long served as a critical carbon sink, consuming about a quarter of the carbon dioxide pollution produced by humans worldwide. But decades of fire suppression, warming temperatures and drought have increased wildfire risks — turning California’s forests from carbon sinks to carbon sources.

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Forest Service issues new 3-year permit for Nestlé to siphon water from SoCal creek

Activists from the Crunch Nestle Alliance shut down the Nestlé water bottling plant in Sacramento on March 20, 2015, during a record drought year. Photo by Dan Bacher. | 
By Dan Bacher | July 4, 2018 | 
In a controversial move blasted by environmental groups, the U.S. Forest Service on June 27 issued a new permit to Nestlé Waters North America allowing the international company to keep withdrawing water from the San Bernardino National Forest for its water bottling pipeline, despite evidence that its operations are draining spring-fed Strawberry Creek.  
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Unprecedented weather in 2017 hurts clarity level in Lake Tahoe

Historic drought followed by record-breaking precipitation and warm lake temperatures converged to produce the lowest annual average clarity levels recorded at Lake Tahoe in 2017, indicates data released by the Tahoe Environmental Research Center at the University of California, Davis.

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